Is It Too Late For Me To Go Back To School For Nursing Now That I’m Older?

Many nurses are torn between two options. Should they finish the degree or let it lapse? It’s not always a case of not wanting to go back to school, but rather of doubting its viability. Many RNs are concerned that they are too old to finish their education. Will they be forced to sit in classes with students who are decades their junior? Will they be able to finish their degree, or has education — as well as technology — changed too much?

Nurses, thankfully, are frequently shocked. For starters, they might discover that their classmates aren’t all that much younger. Nursing students, on average, are older than the average college student, with BSN students in their late twenties and ADN students in their early thirties. The average age of BSN candidates is even higher in tracks created particularly for RNs. According to a recent study published in AORN, the average age is between 38 and 39 years old. Further research at a different institution found that the average was between 36 and 37. Some schools do make demographic information about their pupil’s public, including the average age.

Even averages can be deceiving, as they conceal a surprising amount of variation. It is not uncommon for people in their 50s to return to school. Nontraditional students are frequently more appreciative of and committed to their educational prospects. Nursing professors like their demeanor, and students, in turn, value one other’s experiences.

If you are self-conscious about your age, you should carefully select your program. Author Alaf Meleis outlines the experiences of a group of RN to BSN students in Transitions Theory: Middle-Range and Situation-Specific Theories in Nursing. Nurses had a more difficult time transitioning when their classmates were much younger. Those who were in cohorts with peers were more likely to have an easier re-entry.

One of the most pleasant aspects of the program, according to many nurses, is the relationships formed with other cohort members. However, things can go wrong. If you choose a program where all of your classmates are registered nurses, chances are they’ll be your age and have similar life experiences. If you choose advanced placement in a typical BSN program, you’ll be more aware of your age and feel like you’re out of the group. This could have an impact on your overall satisfaction with the program.

Academic Concerns about Baccalaureate Completion

Another worry for nurses who have worked in the field for a while is whether or not they will be successful academically. If this describes you, keep in mind that adult learning departments commonly oversee RN to BSN programs, and one of the school’s missions is to accommodate you and others like you. Even in an online program, tutoring is sometimes given as part of the package. “The Successful RN to BSN Student: Skills for Success Going Back to School” may be of interest to you.

Concerns about technology can contribute to academic anxiety. Is online education only for the tech-savvy millennials? Computer abilities are important, although the level of expertise required varies. It’s the essentials in some cases: You’ll need to know how to use the internet and how to upload and download attachments, for example. Remember that you will not be the only student in the class who did not grow up surfing the internet or giving PowerPoint presentations in class. Computer skills are frequently included in school orientation. Do some more study and make sure you’re comfortable with the program in question.

If you’re not sure whether you’re ready, start with a light schedule. Many programs permit you to enroll in only one class at a time. For a deeper understanding of nursing careers and what to expect, you can also find nursing schools near you.

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Common Shoulder Pain Issues

As we get older, it is not uncommon to experience minor aches and pain. However, severe or persistent pain may be a sign of something more serious. In some cases, shoulder pain, particularly in the left shoulder, can signify a heart attack. In this article, we will detail some of the more common causes of shoulder pain and what this type of pain could mean when it comes to your overall health.

LEFT SHOULDER PAIN AND HEART ATTACKS

Pain in the left shoulder caused by a heart attack is often referred to as “referred pain,” and it is one of the most common symptoms of a heart attack. Generally speaking, heart attacks are the byproduct of coronary arteries becoming narrowed due to a buildup of plaque. If a piece of hardened plaque breaks free from the walls of the coronary arteries, it can impede the flow of blood to the heart, which can result in a heart attack. The heart and the arm both share nerves that send signals to the brain. As a result, those who experience a heart attack will usually experience shoulder pain before they encounter other symptoms, some of which may include

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Chest pain
  • Breathing problems
  • Lightheadedness
  • Cold sweats
  • Flushing
  • Pain in the neck, jaw, back, or lower abdomen

It is important to note that a heart attack can cause pain in the left, as well as the right shoulder. Therefore, if you’re experiencing pain in either shoulder and have any of the symptoms detailed in this article, you should schedule an appointment with a physician as soon as possible.

SHOULDER PAIN AND ANGINA

Shoulder pain can also be a sign of angina, a condition characterized by severe chest pain, which occurs when the heart does not receive enough blood or oxygen. Although less severe by comparison, angina can trigger many of the same symptoms as a heart attack. There are two different types of angina, stable and unstable. Generally speaking, those with stable angina will only experience pain or discomfort during periods of overexertion. Those with unstable angina, on the other hand, will experience the same pain and discomfort even while they are resting. If you have either form of angina and also struggling with shoulder pain, you should schedule an appointment with a physician.

SKELETOMUSCULAR INJURIES

In some cases, shoulder pain is nothing more than shoulder pain. Skeletomuscular injuries, for example, can cause left or right should pain and, more often than not, is a symptom of damaged bone or tissue in the shoulder. And along with shoulder pain, skeletomuscular injuries can also trigger the following symptoms:

  • Sharp pain lasting for only a few seconds at a time
  • Experiencing pain while moving the shoulder
  • Pain lasting for several days

It is important to note that skeletomuscular injuries affecting the shoulder can cause pain symptoms that are similar to that of a heart attack or angina. Therefore, it would be a good idea to be seen by a physician or cardiologist to rule out possible cardiovascular problems.

Visit WWW.PAIN.HELP for more information about pain relief options.

What is a Registered Nurse?

A registered nurse or RN is a nurse that has an associate’s degree in nursing or a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing. To become a nurse they would also have passed the NCLEX-RN certification exam. Some nurses decide to go on to become an Advanced Practice RN, Clinical Registered Nurse Anesthetist, Clinical Nurse Specialist, or other specialized roles. RNs can work in a broad variety of places, including hospitals, medical specialty areas, or medical offices.

The Duties of an RN

The duties of an RN can vary depending on their place of employment. Some of the things that they regularly do include direct patient care, assisting physicians in a broad variety of medical procedures, offering public health education campaigns, and helping family members to be educated on their loved one’s condition or their own condition. RNs may also administer medication, as well as operate medical equipment as necessary. RNs may choose to focus on a specialty in medicine. This in can include emergency care, surgical, neonatal, geriatric, and pediatric care.

How Much Does an RN Make?

RN salaries are typically around $32.04 an hour depending on their place of employment. This number has been put forth by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. If a nurse is in a specialty field, they may earn more than what could be earned in the normal field of nursing. Certain areas will also offer larger employment bonuses for nurses to hire on.

Job Outlook for Registered Nurses

There is a large demand for registered nurses in the United States today. There is strong growth in this industry because of wider health care availability, the aging population, and more. Nurses will also need to be used to help educate patients on things like dementia, obesity, arthritis, diabetes. There may also be a need for more registered nurses in home healthcare and long-term healthcare facilities.

The need for skilled nurses including registered nurses is only going to grow throughout the years. Becoming a registered nurse takes a lot of education and a lot of work, but becoming an RN is rewarding and can help you to be financially stable.